Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
zweshua

ahhhhhhh A Garota de Ipanema / The Girl from Ipanema

26 posts in this topic

Well as they say you learn something new everyday. Life is amazing as it always surprises you with delight!

I have been practising Insensatez and The Girl from Ipanema for weeks, and really more so making up a scat-type singing --improvisation. In the past I had been learning the Brazilian (I know language is Portugese but I also learnt from another member from here that brazilian Portugese is very different from Portugal portugese. I will want to know more about that please. She said the latter is crap in comparison lol) version of Insensatez, and now I am getting more and more confident playing it I thought I would now start focusing on learning the song so soon I wont have to read it as I sing it.

Then I thought I would search for the lyrics of The Girl from Ipanema, and WOW when I read the translation of the actual brazilian original I was in awae of the beautiful poetry of the song:

Lyrics Translation: The Girl From Ipanema

Posted on 23. Mar, 2010 by Rachel in Learning, Music

One of the most internationally famous bossa nova songs of all time, The Girl from Ipanema is a classic with easy to follow lyrics. It’s useful to see a side by side translation, especially since the song is also sung in English (the most famous recording by Frank Sinatra), but with slightly different lyrics. Here, we have the literal translation of the original Portuguese lyrics sung by Tom Jobim, along with a video with subtitles.

A Garota de Ipanema / The Girl from Ipanema

Olha, que coisa mais linda,
Mais cheia de graça,
É ela, menina, que vem e que passa,
Num doce balanço, a caminho do mar.

Moça do corpo dourado,
Do sol de Ipanema,
O seu balançado
É mais que um poema
É a coisa mais linda
Que eu já vi passar

Ah, por que estou tão sozinho?
Ah, por que tudo é tão triste?
Ah, a beleza que existe
A beleza que não é só minha,
Que também passa sozinha.

Ah, se ela soubesse
Que quando ela passa,
O mundo sorrindo
Se enche de graça
E fica mais lindo
Por causa do amor.

I had had no idea, even though I remember this song when it first came out and was played on radio in UK! And I have always loved this song, but for all these years till yesterday did not know just how different the meaning of the brazilian lyrics were. YES there is great charm with the English version to. It is very simplistic--kind of like having a Burt Bacharack feel about it, but I am very glad I have discoverd the Brazilian poetry now :)))) it adds a whole new depth to the song for me!

SO, do peole here agree that brazilian protugese is different from Portugese. In what way???

Look, such a sight, so beautiful,
So filled with grace,
It;s her, this girl who comes and who passes,
With a sweet swing, on her way to the sea.

Girl with body of gold
From the sun of Ipamena,
Her swing
Is more than a poem,
Is a sight more beautiful
Than I have ever seen pass by.

Ah, why am I so alone?
Why is there so much sadness?
This beauty that exists,
This beauty that is not only mine,
That also passes by alone.

Ah, if she but knew,
That when she passes by,
The world smiles,
Is filled with grace,
And becomes more beautiful,
Because of love.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ps sorry for the forma of the post. When I copied the song it messed up the compositions. Hope its not too confusing. I dont know how to sort it out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a very literal translation and very close to the original, you lose a lot of the poetry, but you get the full meaning.

And yes, Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese are very different, pretty much the same way as English in the US and in the UK. Not only the accents are different, but also the vocabulary and the phrasing are distinct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a very literal translation and very close to the original, you lose a lot of the poetry, but you get the full meaning.

And yes, Brazilian Portuguese and European Portuguese are very different, pretty much the same way as English in the US and in the UK. Not only the accents are different, but also the vocabulary and the phrasing are distinct.

How do you change:

Moça do corpo dourado ,so that is sung : boy with body of gold?

O seu balançado to his swing

Ah, se ela soubesse to Ah, if he but knew

Que quando ela passa, That when he passes by

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to take the context from the entire sentence

Moça do corpo dourado do sol de Ipanema

Corpo dourado do sol ==> it actually refers to a "golden tan", a gorgeous skin tanned by the sun of Ipanema

Balançado = swing, sway, men pay special attention to the way a woman walks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to take the context from the entire sentence

Moça do corpo dourado do sol de Ipanema

Corpo dourado do sol ==> it actually refers to a "golden tan", a gorgeous skin tanned by the sun of Ipanema

Balançado = swing, sway, men pay special attention to the way a woman walks

No I am not understanding?

Are you saying there is no word which connotes girl or her? I mean boys can walk like that also?

Say I was going to sing this song to you, and I tell you I am gay (which I am) and I want to sing it about a boy I fancy etc. Can you tell I am singing it about a boy and not a girl?

In English version we would simply change 'girl from Ipanema' to 'boy from Ipanema'

Also does this mean that no women could sing this song about a boy that they desire??

Edited by zweshua

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The majority of nouns and adjectives in Portuguese can switch the letters "A" and "O" in order to indicate gender.

Garota = female, Garoto = male

Moça = female, moço = male

It's a simple change and then the gender moves from female to male.

O Garoto de Ipanema (male)

A Garota de Ipanema (female)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Não saberia responder em inglês, então espero que o colega zweshua consiga entender em português mesmo:

Say I was going to sing this song to you, and I tell you I am gay (which I am) and I want to sing it about a boy I fancy etc. Can you tell I am singing it about a boy and not a girl?

Also does this mean that no women could sing this song about a boy that they desire??

Antes de tudo, é preciso esclarecer que, ao menos no Brasil imaginário da canção (acho que hoje as coisas mudaram bastante), o jeito das mulheres caminharem é bem diferente do modo masculino. O movimento corporal delas ao caminhar é mais sinuoso, enquanto que o masculino é mais reto.

Dessa forma, ficaria estranho dizer que um homem passa num doce balanço, pois homens não passam (caminham) assim.

Da mesma forma, o trecho "o seu balançado é mais que um poema" não me parece adequado ao modo de caminhar masculino.

Por isso, creio que, na mudança do gênero feminino para o masculino, seja em português ou em inglês, dois trechos da canção, a saber, "que passa, num doce balanço, a caminho do mar" e "o seu balançado é mais que um poema", precisariam ser modificados substancialmente. Acho que o ideal, na mudança da letra, seria vislumbrar alguma poesia no modo masculino de andar, mas não sei se isso é possível. Não sendo, a mudança terá que ser mais radical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Não saberia responder em inglês, então espero que o colega zweshua consiga entender em português mesmo:

Antes de tudo, é preciso esclarecer que, ao menos no Brasil imaginário da canção (acho que hoje as coisas mudaram bastante), o jeito das mulheres caminharem é bem diferente do modo masculino. O movimento corporal delas ao caminhar é mais sinuoso, enquanto que o masculino é mais reto.

Dessa forma, ficaria estranho dizer que um homem passa num doce balanço, pois homens não passam (caminham) assim.

Da mesma forma, o trecho "o seu balançado é mais que um poema" não me parece adequado ao modo de caminhar masculino.

Por isso, creio que, na mudança do gênero feminino para o masculino, seja em português ou em inglês, dois trechos da canção, a saber, "que passa, num doce balanço, a caminho do mar" e "o seu balançado é mais que um poema", precisariam ser modificados substancialmente. Acho que o ideal, na mudança da letra, seria vislumbrar alguma poesia no modo masculino de andar, mas não sei se isso é possível. Não sendo, a mudança terá que ser mais radical.

lol this query brings up issues ....You see if we decide only women can walk that way, and only men the other. What about when reality contradicts this?

ALSO I see many males walk with a rythym , like Samba etc. ESPECIALLY males of colour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you have the wrong idea about Brazil. Anyway, the exception only confirms the rule.

We're not talking about dancing, we're talking about the way people walk. Hip sway is typically a feminine trait, it's biological and a body shaped like an hour glass facilitates that. Men's attention is more focused on chest and shoulders. Again, biology, you don't see a lot of men with an hour glass body.

We're not talking rocket science here. Women with large shoulders and men with hip sway are the exception, not the rule. Nothing wrong with the exception either, it's just the exception.

Sapopemba has a valid point, you can't just change the pronouns from he to she and expect the lyrics to make sense, men and women are not described the say way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0