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Brazilian guitar techniques


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#1 Eugenio

Eugenio

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Postado 19 maio 2015 - 02:28

I thought it'd be interesting for non Portuguese speakers to understand what's been discussed in one of our topics.

The subject is a number of techniques that Brazilian guitarists use that diverge from the standard classical guitar.

Those techniques help create a signature sound for the Brazilian guitar, so it's interesting to understand how they work.

Some of those techniques were born in Brazil, while others were borrowed and/or changed from other musical styles, such as Flamenco.

 

Brazilian Rasgueado

Despite the name "rasgueado", it's not the same as it is used by Spanish guitarists. The Brazilian rasgueado typically uses i-m to strum the strings upwards, and more than one string at a time. It resembles the i-m-a motion when producing chords, but it allows for much higher speeds and it sounds different.

 

Baden Powell was a master of that technique. Notice that in his rendition of the One Note Samba, he uses the technique extensively after 0:45

 

 

And here's a quick tutorial as to how the technique works:

 



#2 Eugenio

Eugenio

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Postado 21 maio 2015 - 10:55

p-i as a pedal

This is a techique commonly used to create a "pedal" or a sense of a continuous rhythmic pulse. Garoto is considered a pioneer in the concept, even though he did not use p-i (we'll see that in the next section when we show "alzapúa".

 

Ulisses Rocha wrote an arrangement for Gismonti's "Infância" that makes extensive use of p-i

 

 

Below is just a short, amateurish tutorial depicting the technique and how it's used in Rabello's rendition of Garoto's Lamentos do Morro.

 

 

Lamentos-Morro-Intro.JPG