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Hi anyone..... :P

Could anyone please help me translating the following titles:

O choro de Juliana

Bate-coxa

Both tunes are by Marco Pereira. I belive O choro de Juliana is about some fish...? Or is it a girls name?

Bate-coxa has something to do with thighs - but what?

All help is greatly appreciated :thumbsupsmiley:

Cheers

A confused Norwegian!

Marius

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Hi Marius,

O Choro de Juliana - There's a pun in this title. Choro is Portuguese for "to cry", like babies do when they are upset. Choro is also the name for one of the most traditional Brazilian musical styles. And the music is intended to be something soothing, nice, like when giving a baby a pacifier. Juliana is a girls's name, in this specific case, Marco's daughter. So, it can be understood as a "The Choro for Juliana", or the "The Cry of Juliana". Marco himself told in one of his CDs that he started composing this piece when he was by Juliana's crib one night.

Bate-Coxa - This is an expression commonly used in the Northeast and refers to popular dance parties where the couples are so close together that their lags get entangled and hit each other's all the time. Coxa is, indeed, Portuguese for thigh, and Bate is Portuguese for "to hit". So, the overall idea is that the piece is one good for dancing.

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Hi Marius,

O Choro de Juliana - There's a pun in this title. Choro is Portuguese for "to cry", like babies do when they are upset. Choro is also the name for one of the most traditional Brazilian musical styles. And the music is intended to be something soothing, nice, like when giving a baby a pacifier. Juliana is a girls's name, in this specific case, Marco's daughter. So, it can be understood as a "The Choro for Juliana", or the "The Cry of Juliana". Marco himself told in one of his CDs that he started composing this piece when he was by Juliana's crib one night.

Bate-Coxa - This is an expression commonly used in the Northeast and refers to popular dance parties where the couples are so close together that their lags get entangled and hit each other's all the time. Coxa is, indeed, Portuguese for thigh, and Bate is Portuguese for "to hit". So, the overall idea is that the piece is one good for dancing.

Hi Eugenio

THANKS!!

Very helpful!

Marius :worshippy:

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