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zweshua

do you wish your language was called 'Brazilian'??

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zweshua    0

I am learning all the time which I love, and I like asking questions

I am learning to sing in Portugese, two songs up to now, Insensatez, and Garota de Ipanema . I LOVE Brazilian music, and language and the Rhythm of how it is sang.

I was listening to the 'original' Garota de Ipanema, the first bit , and as I am singing with him, I am SO into the sound of the language, its feel and rhythm, I am smiling out of my face!!! I abolutely love this song and melody for many many years, and now I am singing in the actual language and have found the proper translation, which is really poetic, far more than the English version, I feel ecstatic learning and singing and playing it

Obviously at the moment, when I sing it, I am not really knowing the meaning of the words, but just the sound, feel, and rhythm. But I want to ask this about your language:

At Jazzguitar forums and the thread asking for Brazilian guitar/singers, Patskywriter says this which when I first read it months ago surprised me because I didn't know. Because I just thought Brazilians spoke and sang in Portugese:

brazilian portuguese is definitely all that you described. but have you heard portuguese portuguese? to my ears, it's almost ugly in comparison in terms of sound and inflection.

So would you agree with her? And if so would you like your language to be called Brazilian?? Or...?

If you do agree, I also would love you tell me, give example what she means?

Edited by zweshua

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Eugenio    0

That was a lively debate back in the late 1800's and early 1900's, there was a lot of nationalism in vogue at the time, I don't see a lot of movement towards that anymore, most people are just fine with Portuguese or Brazilian Portuguese. Pretty much like American and British.

One important different, however, it's that Brazilian TV shows and music have a lot of penetration in Portugal, but the other way around is basically non-existent.

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zweshua, glad to know that you love Brazilian Portuguese! And I cannot agree more, the original lyrics of Garota de Ipanema is way more beatiful than the English version!

Weel, I don't know, I am just fine calling it Portuguese. After all, it is Portuguese. Although they sound different, most of the words and the structure are the same. But the accent is very different, often times I just cannot understand what portuguese people are saying. I don't know if it is uglier than the brazlian accent, but I find the brazilian Portuguese is more melodic.

Do you have any recordings of you playing and singing in Portuguese? I am curious to hear it!

Cheers!

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An update on my opinion of Portuguese as spoken in Portugal: I no longer find it ugly. My ears have adjusted to the way it's spoken there now that I've discovered a couple of musical groups that I like. I grew up hearing Brasilian Portuguese on the radio and TV. The very first time I heard spoken Brasilian Portuguese was when I bought a cheap shortwave radio when I was in high school. I recognized a familiar sound and vocal inflection and said to myself, "Hey, there's a black person on shortwave!" After tuning in and hearing the words clearly, I realized that I was listening to Brasilian Portuguese.

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zweshua    0

zweshua, glad to know that you love Brazilian Portuguese! And I cannot agree more, the original lyrics of Garota de Ipanema is way more beatiful than the English version!

Weel, I don't know, I am just fine calling it Portuguese. After all, it is Portuguese. Although they sound different, most of the words and the structure are the same. But the accent is very different, often times I just cannot understand what portuguese people are saying. I don't know if it is uglier than the brazlian accent, but I find the brazilian Portuguese is more melodic.

Do you have any recordings of you playing and singing in Portuguese? I am curious to hear it!

Cheers!

Well you just said it, Brazilian Portugese :icon_sunny: . I came to these forums to say exactly this after just watching the guy, who can speak many languages whow differentiated between 'Brazilian Portugese' and 'Euoropean Portugese': (in part where he is speaking in ? Portugese )

I would very much like to show off my singing to you in Brazilian Portugese to you. Well, in 2011 I had VERY serious virus hit my computer and I lost lots of stuff, and including my Skype connection. I haven't yet got to get it going again cause I am not technical. But this may inspire me to. Let me ask you a question: Of Brazilian singers who would you say is the most interesting in how they sing it? IE in English I love Afro Americans in the way they bend the language etc. So I am just wondering...?

Edited by zweshua

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zweshua    0

An update on my opinion of Portuguese as spoken in Portugal: I no longer find it ugly. My ears have adjusted to the way it's spoken there now that I've discovered a couple of musical groups that I like. I grew up hearing Brasilian Portuguese on the radio and TV. The very first time I heard spoken Brasilian Portuguese was when I bought a cheap shortwave radio when I was in high school. I recognized a familiar sound and vocal inflection and said to myself, "Hey, there's a black person on shortwave!" After tuning in and hearing the words clearly, I realized that I was listening to Brasilian Portuguese.

Good to hear from you, I've missed you :) Ahaa so you don't find it ugly now. I am a bit disappointed lol. So hmmm do you think that Brazilian Portugese is more influenced by African culture than European Portugese? That is what you seem to mean......?

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Good to hear from you, I've missed you :) Ahaa so you don't find it ugly now. I am a bit disappointed lol. So hmmm do you think that Brazilian Portugese is more influenced by African culture than European Portugese? That is what you seem to mean......?

Well, the inflections of that speaker on shortwave radio were familiar-sounding to me, so at first, until I heard the words, I thought the person was black. It's very possible that the person might have been a black Brasilian--who knows? I remember taking a metro train ride in Paris while on vacation some years ago. I witnessed a few of of the white riders rolling their eyes while overhearing some black folks having a conversation. Although I did notice that they were pronouncing the words differently than what I learned in school (which is what I assumed the whites didn't like), I really enjoyed their vocal inflections. They had a familiar musicality. :)

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Eugenio    0

Brazilian Portuguese has a number of different influences and regional accents, we should avoid generalizations. Most typically, you'll hear people from Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, but the way a gaúcho from the far south speaks is very different from those two groups, and the same applies to speakers living in the northeast.

Think of those differences pretty much the way an American born and raised in New York can immediately spot a Texan, or a Londoner can instantly spot a Scottish.

The language spoken in Brazil received a number of influences from Tupi, Yorubá, French, Italian and Spanish, and again, those influences vary a lot according to the region. Pronunciation of the letters "R" and "S" can be very distinctive, as well as the use of open vowels and the inflections.

The guy in the video speaks Portuguese with an European accent.

And just to provoke a reaction from some of my fellow forumites, the most beautiful variation of Portuguese is spoken in Salvador, Bahia, one of the most gorgeous places on the planet! :):yes::D

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Nice points made, Eugenio. I don't speak Portuguese, but I've heard it so much that I can often tell what part of Brasil the speaker is from.

About the guy in the video … Many years ago, a Brasilian told me that a person speaking European Portuguese sounds as if he's talking while drinking a glass of water. That's what I thought of while watching the video, LOL.

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